How to present world class fitness videos with confidence, speed and better results!

If you want to present fitness videos or launch an on-demand workout channel then this blog post is for you.

If you’re used to teaching to a room full of participants, presenting a fitness class alone to a camera can seem ridiculously intimidating.

Preparation is key. Without the visual feedback from people in front of you, there’s more to remember and less help to trigger teaching points.

With this list of tips, you can present world-class fitness videos that you can be proud of and deliver the best exercise experience for your audience so they come back for more.

 

REHEARSE, REHEARSE, REHEARSE

 

Let’s get the most obvious tip out of the way at the start. Rehearsing pays of massively. The more familiar you are with your workout the more confident and natural your performance becomes.

Making mistakes can be frustrating and time consuming. If you want to bang out your workouts quickly, then take the time to rehearse so you’re more prepared and less likely to make mistakes.

When you know your workouts instinctively you can focus more on your performance and connection though the camera to your audience.

 

AVOID THE LONG INTROS

 

Keep your intros short and concise and aim for no longer than 10-30 seconds. People want to workout not listen to a lecture, so if you’re not saying what people want to hear they may not stick around.

If you’re workout warrants further explanation and back ground information, make a separate video. This provides a more appropriate opportunity for you to connect with your audience on a deeper level at a more appropriate time and doesn’t frustrate your audience if they want to get into the workout quickly.

A good intro:

  • qualifies your audience by need, ability or objective
  • gives a name to your workout and highlights the benefits
  • highlights and equipment requirements
  • tells them how long the workout is.

 

Anymore than this will overload the viewer with too much information and cause unnecessary delay to the workout.

Remember, you ability to deliver confidently to camera without ‘ums’ and ‘errs’ demonstrates your professionalism and ability to communicate.

If you’re using videos to bring more people into your live classes, then it’s in your best interest to make the best possible first impression.

Here are some good examples of workout introductions:

 

Yoga Class for BEGINNERS with Ashton August (Full Class)

15-Minute Beginner’s At-Home Cardio Workout 

BODYCOMBAT INVINCIBLE | Workout #14

 

MOVE AND TALK

 

There’s no reason why you can’t intro your workout while your audience is moving.

If you’ve planned your workout correctly then your warm-up moves should be low impact and easy to follow making it possible for you to maximise the workout opportunity.

 

DON’T SELF SABOTAGE

 

Without the right preparation you’re more likely to make mistakes and say the wrong things on camera.

If you’re new to filming your workouts, relax, it’s OK to make mistakes and you’ll get better with experience.

If you do something by mistake in your video it can be hard not to show your disappointment,. But don’t stop and ruin what could otherwise be a perfectly good video.

Always film your workouts by imagining that they’re LIVE! What would you do it you made the same mistake teaching in a club?

You correct yourself and move on. You don’t have to be perfect, just be prepared to deal with mistakes in the most professional way.

 

WORD ECONOMY

 

When it’s just you and your camera, silence can be deafening and one of the hardest things for fitness instructors to be comfortable with is being silent.

If you want your audience to get the most out of the workout then you need to give them a reason to listen. If you’re talking all the time, it’s difficult for them to tell what’s most important.

If you find yourself talking too much, train yourself to coach in as few words as possible. Think before you speak and be economical with your words, review the phrase in your mind before sharing it.

This will help you to cue better and give any music the room to breathe for a better exercise experience.

 

FUTURE PROOF YOUR COACHING

 

Present your workouts so they’re suitable for returning fans. You audience will only be first-timers once, so coach for progression instead of introduction.

When you present your workouts, imagine your audience have already done it 10 times. This will help you to create workouts with a longer shelf life that will appeal to returning fans as well as first timers.

If you want your participants to repeat your workouts, then you need to coach and deliver in a way that doesn’t frustrate the experience or slow them down.

If you teach in a way that assumes everyone is doing it for the first time, then the pace of the workout could be interrupted by explanations or demonstrations that are unnecessary to a more experience audience.

 

BE APPROPRIATELY DESCRIPTIVE

 

Sometimes following along to exercise videos becomes an audio only experience. When you present fitness videos you have to rely on more than visual cues.

If participants are adopting yoga poses or exercise that make it difficult for them to see the screen, you’ll need to change your coaching style to be more descriptive.

When visual coaching cues are compromised you’ll need to rely on strong verbal cuing. If you can pace your cuing with moments of silence, then it’s easier for your audience to follow your coaching cues when they need them the most.

 

AVOID NEGATIVE CUING

 

Making your workouts a positive experience for your audience will encourage them to return for more.

Rehearsing your workouts and paying attention to your teaching cues can help you to become a better coach.

Avoid negative cues like ‘don’t’ and ‘can’t’ and set objectives instead.

Warning people what they’re doing things wrong takes up valuable coaching time and doesn’t help your audience feel good either.

 

Here are some examples of negative cues and alternative phrases.

 

NEGATIVE: “Don’t let your knees fall inward as you squat down.”

OBJECTIVE: “If your knees are falling in, keep you them inline with your second toe as you squat down”

 

NEGATIVE: “Don’t bounce the barbell on the chest”

OBJECTIVE: “Are you smooth and under control as you lower the bar down?”

 

NEGATIVE: “If you can’t keep your speed up, drop your bike’s resistance”

OBJECTIVE: “Keep moving and drop your resistance if you need to, then when you’re ready take it up again”

 

END WITH A STRONG OUTRO

 

Just like your intro, you need to script your outro. The last thing you want to do is fluff up the ending when your workout has gone so well.

Preparing your outro in advance is the only way to wrap up your video with confidence and avoid waffling.

The secret is simple here, just figure out the last think you want to say (word-for-word) and work towards it.

So what should you say as your outro?

  • Congratulate your audience on completing the workout
  • Empathise and let them know that you know how they feel.
  • Repeat the workout name and focus.
  • Tell them what to do next e.g. “if you like’d this workout , next time try this one…”

 

Remember at the end of the workout, your audience will be tired but they’ll also feel great, so it’s the perfect time to ask something of your audience.

That could be a request to subscribe to your YouTube channel, follow a link to find out more about your local classes or take advantage of a promo you’re currently running.

 

So now you know how to present fitness videos that will deliver your audience the best exercise experience.

 

 

How To Deliver a Great Presentation for Video. The 15 Point Checklist.

How can you capture a great presentation on video that you can turn into successful marketing content?

If you’re planning to film a presentation which you’ll later share on social media and YouTube, it’s important to create content that looks and sounds great.

These 15 top tips will help you to create and deliver a professional presentation to your audience that establishes you as an expert and authority in your field.

 

Read The Presentation Book by Emma Leddon. Great presentations don’t happen by chance. This book will help you to prepare and structure a high-value presentation that will keep your audience engaged and make it easy to edit into neat videos.

Prepare your content in the right format. Why are so many people are still creating presentations and slides in old formats? All PowerPoint presentations should be created in 16:9, the modern aspect ratio of a widescreen TV so they display correctly during your presentation and slides edit neatly into your videos.

 

Rehearse for the big day. As Emma Ledden explains in her book, practice will allow you to present to the best of your ability. Seek feedback from others with a mock presentation, don’t just send them a copy of your script or PowerPoint.

 

Download all content for your presentation. Technical hitches and interruptions during your presentation can very embarrassing and frustrating for your audience. You can’t always guarantee a reliable internet connection in unfamiliar locations, so instead of streaming content or hosting your content online, download all media you need and create a backup on a USB stick.

Stand still. Staying rooted to the spot when you talk allows you to deliver your content with authority. Wandering around doesn’t make your presentation more professional, in fact it’s a sign of inexperience. Make it easy for the camera man to film you and you’ll get a great video in focus.

Turn off your phone. You don’t want your mum calling you when you’re on stage. It’ll be in your video as well!

Choose your wardrobe carefully. If you’re presenting in typical gym clothes, be aware that fluorescent colours can appear unnaturally bright and detailed patterned leggings can cause strange patterns on video. Wearing all black looks boring and very flat on camera but opting for a white shirt could mean that there’s little contrast between you and your environment so there’s nothing to make your videos ‘pop’!

Stay away from projectors and screens. Never stand or walk in front of a projector or TV screen. The extra light will cause the image of you to become over exposed and there’s little that can be done in editing to fix this.

Prepare to wear or use a mic. You may be asked to either hold a stick mic or wear a head mic or lapel mic for your presentation. To capture the best sound with a stick mic, hold it at chin level pointing to your nose. Lanyards, necklaces and can all hit lapel mics causing unwanted noise so be prepared to take them off and move long hair out of the way too.

Always face front. Never turn your back on your audience to read from the slides. If you need to turn to read your slides you haven’t rehearsed enough. Practice until you know your presentation so you always face the audience and camera.

Be confident. Speak to the people at the back of the room, don’t expect the microphone to do the work for you. You need to deliver your presentation with volume and enthusiasm to capture great audio for your video. If you’re delivering a presentation on a noisy trade floor it’s even more important to speak up or your voice will be drowned out by the background noise. As a simple rule of thumb, if you can’t hear your own voice coming out of the speakers you’re not talking loudly enough.

Drink water. Stay hydrated and sip plenty of water before you present. If you’re dehydrated your saliva will become sticky and you’ll make clicky noises when you speak. These can be obvious in recordings and be distracting for some people to listen to.

Repeat the question. Q&A can yield some of the best and most useful content for marketing. If one person from your audience needs your help with a problem, it’s likely there are others searching for the same answers on YouTube. To create great Q&A videos, summarise the question before you answer and make sure whoever is asking the question uses a mic. This helps other audience members who have not heard the question put your answer into context and neatly packages a specific comment for a stand alone video.